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Security Officer

 

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Security Officer James Bradshaw
Making sure everyone fells safe


July 2003

Security Guard James Bradshaw
“You meet some good people coming through that door, good people with problems, and when they leave most of the time they are smiling.”

Security officer James Bradshaw worked as a corrections officer for 30 years at San Quentin and Vacaville, retired, and now enjoys working at the crisis center. His job is to make sure the crisis center is a place where everyone feels safe. He checks people for weapons. He enjoys working there because he can see what a difference the place makes in people’s lives and is excited about being a part of it.

“A lot of times I’m their first contact. I greet them coming in the door and then wave to them as they go. I like working with the community. You meet some good people coming through that door, good people with problems, and when they leave most of the time they are smiling. I see people come in crying who have been abused, domestic problems, mental health problems, children come in from the schools with their counselors, people from board and care homes, they all come here and the crisis specialists talk to them, calm them down and put them on the right track to treatment.

“A lot of the people who come in here are angry about something. Sometimes they are running from something, and sometimes they are looking for someone to settle their issues. They are angry at me because I represent some type of authority figure and they’ll go off. They will yell, they’ll scream, they’ll pound on the doors and they threaten me. They’ll threaten the clinicians. That’s why I’m here, to be that first contact, to talk to them and to try and quell whatever is bothering them in a professional way.”

Most of the time he is able to succeed, but not always. “I have had to call the sheriff’s department or Vallejo police, and they will either restrain the person or escort them out of here. Then I’ve seen those same people, after a week or two of being in jail or going to treatment, come back in and apologize, and that is a very good feeling to know that we were able to control a situation that could have been worse if we hadn’t dealt with it.”